DELMARVA ALMANAC

HERITAGE: Telling Delmarva's Story

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Thomas Savage - American Dreamer


This is the story of Thomas Savage who was probably the first permanent English settler here on Virginia's Eastern Shore.


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Rev. Charles A. Tindley


This is the story of one of America's great gospel music composers and a Delmarva native.


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Assateague Island’s Early Beginnings


Assateague Island is 37 miles long and actually home to three separately managed parks. The story of how it got divvied up goes back a few hundred years.


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Edmund Scarborough & Ann Toft


This is the story about colonial Delmarva’s power couple Edmund Scarborough and Ann Toft.


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Delmarva River & Bay Pilots


Learn about the people responsible for guiding ships through our rivers and bays.


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Absalom Jones & Richard Allen


It is interesting to note how many people from Delmarva have had a profound impact on the early Civil Rights movement.


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Delmarva’s Whispering Giants


In two of Delmarva’s Beach towns there are large statues honoring the native peoples of this region One is in Bethany Beach and the other is in Ocean City. These are part of a series of statues called the Trail of Whispering Giants.



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Delmarva Witchtrials


With Halloween just a few days away it is that time of year we indulge in scary stories. Delmarva has many ghostly legends chronicled in books and now by tour guides across the region. We also have a small history of witchcraft.


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A Short History of The Rehoboth Art League


Since its founding the Rehoboth Art League has provided a variety of art learning experiences for artists and art enthusiasts.


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Slavery On Delmarva


Racial conflict continues to be a big part of our public discourse. It is hard to deny that our heritage of state sanctioned slavery is at root of these tensions. This is a brief overview of the history of slavery on Delmarva.


Archived Stories




Delmarva History In October

October 1, 1664
Dutch and Swedish settlers in the Delaware region agree to swear allegiance to British King Charles II.

October 1, 1777
Eastern Shore native Captain Lambert Wickes served with distinction in the Continental Navy, was lost at sea with his Sloop-of-War Reprisal.

October 3, 1898
The first rural free delivery of mail in Delaware was initiated when a route was established originating in Harrington. Joseph G. Peckham was appointed as the official mail carrier for the route which served 600 families.

October 4, 1638
Lord Baltimore forbid all citizens of Virginia and Maryland from trading with the native peoples of the lower Eastern Shore.

October 8, 1916
The first boat went through the Lewes and Rehoboth Canal which was authorized by the U.S. River and Harbor Act of 1912. Digging began on November 5th, 1913

October 8, 1903
A tropical storm ravaged Ocean City, Maryland destroying several properties including two hotels.

October 10, 1891
Six seamen were killed when President Benjamin Harrison's official yacht, the Despatch, was wrecked in a storm off of Assateague Island.

October 10, 1663
Col. Edmund Scarburgh and his Virginia militia terrorized the people of Manokin and Annamessex Hundreds in an effort to claim that area for Virginia.

October 12, 1929
A massive wildfire began in the Great Cypress Swamp on the southern border of Delaware. It is believed sparks from a moonshiner’s still started the blaze which destroyed 5,000 acres of drought blighted forest and bog peat. The fir lasted several weeks despite firefighter’s efforts. It was finally put out by seasonal rain storms.

October 14, 2008
The historic lightship Overfalls was towed from Lewes, Delaware, north through the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal and then south again through the bay to be repaired in Norfolk, Virginia.

October 15, 1928
A rare but mild earth quake was recorded with an epicenter near Ocean City.

October 16, 1798
Warner Mifflin died. He was an early American legislator from Delaware who petitioned the U.S. Congress to have slavery made illegal in the new Constitution.

October 17, 1886
The Great Salisbury Fire began at Toadvine's Livery Stable on Dock Street, now Market Street. Twenty-two acres and two hundred buildings in the center of town were burned to the ground.

October 18, 1933
A white mob lynched George Armwood, a black prisoner in Princess Anne, Maryland before he could be tried for assaulting seventy-one year-old Mary Denston.

October 21, 1996
Fish with deep, bloody lesions were first reported in the Pocomoke River. This was later identified as Pfiesteria a toxic disease said to affect fish, humans, and other animals.

October 21, 1878
During a rare late season hurricane a "great tidal wave" decimated 35 miles of shoreline from Collins Beach to Woodland Beach in the present day Bombay Hook Wildlife Refuge in Kent County, Delaware.

October 22, 1722
A Peace Treaty was signed between the Assateague and Pocomoke Indians, and Lord Charles Calvert, Governor of Maryland.

October 24, 1787
Two petitions were brought before the Delaware General Assembly. One supported the ratification of the new U.S. Constitution. The other sought to establish the United States capitol in Delaware.

October 26, 1899
Birth date of William Julius "Judy" Johnson, the first person from Delaware elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

October 27, 1682
William Penn landed in America for the first time near New Castle Delaware's Battery Park.

October 28, 1850
The Brandywine Lighthouse, located seven miles off shore from Lewes, Delaware, was lit for the first time.

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